Overseas Press Club

Overseas Press Club Foundation
Encouraging the next generation of foreign correspondents

40 West 45 Street, New York NY 10036 USA| 201.493.9087 | foundation@opcofamerica.org

2004 Winners, OPC Foundation
Seated (l-r) Zamiska, Mahr, Patience, Burke, and Whittaker; Standing (l-r): Hanel, Garland, Strickler, Taylor, Merlino, Nawa and Shaftel.

 

The 2004 OPC Foundation Scholars, test

ALEXANDER KENDRICK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Doug Merlino, University of California/Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

From conversations he had with refugees while traveling in West Africa, Doug became interested in how societies and states recover from mass trauma.  A graduate of Claremont McKenna College, Doug wrote about the success of an experimental court system in Sierra Leone in handling post-conflict justice.

DAVID R. SCHWEISBERG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Nicholas Zamiska, Yale University

When he spent a summer as an English teacher in China, Nicholas became a critic of China’s atrophied media establishment.  He wrote about the self-censoring he encountered as a teacher and its numbing impact on his classroom.

REUTERS SCHOLARSHIP
Andrew C. StrickLer, University of California/Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

During his extensive travels, Andrew became fascinated with the disconnection that occurs between the intentions of those in power and their effects on those they exert influence upon.  A graduate of St. John’s College in Santa Fe, he wrote about his plans to investigate the intended and unforeseen impact of American trade legislation on the Kenyan and Ugandan economies.

HARPER’S MAGAZINE SCHOLARSHIP in memory of I.F.Stone
Tess Taylor, New York University Graduate School of Journalism

An Amherst College graduate, Tess is concerned with the international politics surrounding dumping solid waste and the effects of landfills on the communities who live with them.  She wrote about the long-term impact of the 4,000 tons of poisoned ash the ship Khian Sea dumped on a Haitian beach almost 20 years ago.

IRENE CORBALLY KUHN SCHOLARSHIP
Fariba Nawa, New York University Graduate School of Journalism

An Afghan-born American Muslim who is fluent in Persian/Dari and Arabic, Fariba has begun her next major project, a book on the still-untold story of the drug trade in Afghanistan.  Her essay was about Afghan families that sell off their young daughters as brides to pay off drug debts.

H.L. STEVENSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Joseph Hanel, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

After a railroad journey that took him from St. Petersburg to Hong Kong, Joe,wrote about the life lessons learned playing Black Jack in the dining car on the Trans-Siberian Railroad. A graduate of the University of Colorado, he traveled from Bologna, Italy, to accept the ward.

STAN SWINTON SCHOLARSHIP
Matt Whittaker, University of Tennessee/Knoxville

As an exchange student studying journalism in Denmark, Matt traveled to Bosnia and Herzegovina to learn more about landmines.  In his essay, Matt wrote about the financial and human cost of the seemingly forgotten yet ongoing problem of leftover landmines in Bosnia.

THEO WILSON SCHOLARSHIP
SARAH GARLAND, New York University Graduate School of Journalism

A graduate of Macalester College, Sarah wrote about the transnationalization of Mexican gangs, and what happens when Mexican New York gang members return home to Mexico and bring their violent ways with them.  Sarah intends to expand her research on this issue to El Salvador.

EMANUEL R. FREEDMAN SCHOLARSHIP
Garance Burke, University of California/Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

As a reporter in Mexico City, Garance became enmeshed in the country’s economic crisis and the sociopolitical stories it spawned.  An Anthropology major at Brown, Garance wrote about the absence of outrage concerning the disappearance and murders of young women in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

DAN ELDON SCHOLARSHIP
Martin Patience, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

From Scotland and a graduate of the University of Glasgow, Martin spent four days last summer with the Ma’aza Bedouins in Egypt’s Eastern Desert.  He wrote about the Bedouin culture, its dependence on rain, and the attraction for one Bedouin who nevertheless moved away.

ROY ROWAN SCHOLARSHIP
David Shaftel, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

A reporter for two years at The Cambodian Daily, David turned his sights on its neighbor, and wrote his essay on the history and life of those who live near the Burma Road.  A Government major at Lehigh, he intends to continue his research in Burma on the economic and social issues that transcend borders.

FLORA LEWIS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Krista Mahr, University of California/Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Krista first met the people of Tasiilaq, capital of East Greenland, as a reporter for an Icelandic magazine. In her essay, she wrote about the life of its indigenous Inuit residents  who, while living in one of the most far-flung corners of the earth,  are caught between their native culture and the imported Western world.

 

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